Willingale One Name Study
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Keith Willingale

Keith Willingale

Male 1944 - 2018  (74 years)

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  • Name Keith Willingale 
    Born 23 Jan 1944  Southampton, Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Military Service 1966 
    Midshipman on HMS Ajax 
    Military Service 1 Sep 1967 
    Promoted to Lieutenant RN 
    Military Service 1972 
    Lieutenant HMS Eagle 
    Military Service 1 Sep 1975 
    Promoted to Lt Cdr RN 
    Occupation Aft 1992 
    Wine Producer 
    Retirement 23 Jan 1994 
    Retired Royal Navy as Lt Cmdr 
    Died 10 Feb 2018 
    Age 74 years 
    Buried 27 Feb 2018  Westerleigh Crematorium, Westerleigh, Bristol Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • During his time in the Royal Navy Keith served on Eagle, Ajax, Tenby, Nubian, Bulwark, Leander, London, Naiad - and he also did a spell on Ark Royal 09.

      WILLINGALE Keith "Bow in the Cloud" died suddenly on Saturday the 10th February 2018 aged 74 years. Beloved Husband to Esther. Loving father to Louise and Sophie. Adored grandad to James. Funeral service will be held on Tuesday the 27th February in Westerleigh Crematorium " Waterside Chapel" at 12.30 pm. Family flowers only. Donations if desired payable to "West of England M.S. Therapy Centre" May be sent c/o Philip Horgan at L.E.Perry funeral directors. Ridgeway Coach House.13 Hampton Street.Tetbury.GL8 8JN. Phone 01666 502295
    Person ID I0276  Willingale One Name Study
    Last Modified 30 Mar 2018 

    Father Ancestors Arthur Frank Willingale
              b. 26 May 1915, Croydon, Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 1 Aug 1988, Southampton, Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Mother Betty Aline Winifred Winship
              b. 8 Feb 1915, Portsmouth, Hampshire Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 8 Mar 2005, Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital, Exeter, Devon Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years) 
    Family ID F0091  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Living 
    Children 
    +1. Living
     2. Living
    Family ID F0102  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Living 
    Children 
    Married: 1x1. Living
     2. Living
    Family ID F0104  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 23 Jan 1944 - Southampton, Hampshire Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend Address Location Church Parish or Cemetery Registration District Town/City/Village County State/Province Country Region Cant Locate Not Set

  • Photos At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    Keith Willingale
    Keith Willingale
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    Keith Willingale
    Keith Willingale

    Documents
    Midshipman K Willingdale
    Midshipman K Willingdale
    HMS Ajax commissioning booklet circa 1964
    HMS Eagle Commissioning Book 1970-1972
    HMS Eagle Commissioning Book 1970-1972
    extract with photo and mention of Lt Willingale
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.

    Correspondence
    Thomas Willingale Blue Heritage Plaque
    Thomas Willingale Blue Heritage Plaque

    London Gazette
    Keith Willingale promoted Lt
    Keith Willingale promoted Lt
    Keith Willingale promoted Lt Cdr
    Keith Willingale promoted Lt Cdr
    Keith Willingale retirement
    Keith Willingale retirement
    Keith Willingale, promoted Lt. Cdr.
    Keith Willingale, promoted Lt. Cdr.

    Press Cuttings At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    Welcome to our tiny land of milk and honey
    Welcome to our tiny land of milk and honey
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.

    Ships
    HMS Ajax
    HMS Ajax
    HMS Ajax (F114) was a Leander-class frigate of the Royal Navy. She was built by the famous Cammell Laird company of Birkenhead. Ajax was launched on 16 August 1962 and commissioned on 10 December 1963. She was originally intended to be named HMS Fowey, and laid down as a Rothesay class, but instead became part of Batch 1 of the Leander class.


    In 1964, Ajax deployed to the Far East, becoming leader of the 24th Escort Group. It was a long deployment, and Ajax did not return to the UK until 1968. In 1970, Ajax became the Gibraltar guard ship, a required deployment at that time due to the tense fears of invasion by General Franco. Later that year, Ajax began modernisation that lasted to 1973, having her 4.5 inch turret replaced by an Ikara anti-submarine missile system. GWS22 SeaCat (2 x 4) was fitted aft and 40 mm guns were mounted amidships.


    In 1974, Ajax assisted in the evacuation of British citizens after the Turkish invasion of Cyprus. In 1976, while on a visit to Canada, Ajax visited the town of Ajax, Ontario, which had been named in honour of her predecessor which had been a Leander class cruiser, which had seen service at the Battle of the River Plate during the Second World War. The 'new' Ajax was granted the freedom of the city of Ajax.


    In 1977, Ajax underwent a refit at Devonport Dockyard. In 1979, Ajax deployed to the Mediterranean. In 1980, she underwent a refit at Gibraltar which was completed in 1981. That year, Ajax became leader of the 1st Frigate Squadron. She did not take part in the 1982 Falklands War, but was deployed as Persian Gulf guard ship. She participated in further deployments that culminated in the highlight of her final year in 1985, when she escorted the HMY Britannia, which had a number of the Royal Family on a tour of Italy. She was decommissioned 31 May, then replaced HMS Salisbury as a static training ship at Devonport. On 3 August 1988, Ajax arrived at Millom, Cumbria to be broken up.

    HMS Eagle
    HMS Eagle
    HMS Eagle was an aircraft carrier of the Royal Navy, in service 1951-1972. With her sister ship Ark Royal, she is one of the two largest British aircraft carriers yet built.


    She was initially laid down in 1942 at Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast as one of four ships of the Audacious-class aircraft carrier. These were laid down during World War II as part of the British naval buildup during that conflict. However, two were cancelled at the end of hostilities, and the remaining two were suspended. Originally designated Audacious, she was finally launched as Eagle (the fifteenth Royal Navy ship to receive this name) in March 1946, after the Audacious class carrier Eagle was cancelled.


    A number of changes were incorporated into the design, although Eagle was launched too early to see an angled flight deck installed, and the ship was commissioned in October 1951. A year later she took part in the first large NATO naval exercise, Exercise Mainbrace.


    Her first wartime service came in 1956, when she took part in the Suez Crisis. The ship's aircraft of that period included Westland Wyverns, Douglas Skyraiders, Armstrong Whitworth Sea Hawks and de Havilland Sea Venoms. An angled flight deck was fitted in 1956-1957 with a mirror landing sight.


    The admiralty had originally planned to give the Eagle a complete rebuild on the lines of HMS Victorious, but due to high costs this was abandoned. Eagle was instead given a more austere, but still extensive modernization. The changes included major improvements to the accommodation, including the installation of air conditioning. The island was completely rebuilt and the new 3D Type 984 radar was to be installed. The flight deck was modified and included a new 2½ inch armoured deck with a full 8.5 degree angle, two new steam catapults were fitted as well as new arrester gear and mirror sights. As well, an overhaul of the DC electrical systems, AC generators was fitted to give additional power. It was decided that Eagle would have her anti-aircraft guns removed and replaced by the Sea Cat missile system. All of Eagle’s original machinery and equipment was fully overhauled. This refit was budgeted to cost around £11 million and although expensive was still three times cheaper than building a new ship, it was expected that this refit would allow the Eagle to operate until the early 1980’s.[citation needed]


    In 1959 Eagle entered Devonport Dockyard to begin this extensive refit. By 1964 the refit was complete although at a significantly increased cost which had seen the original plan to install a new armoured deck abandoned.[citation needed] Standard displacement had increased to around 44,000 tons and Eagle was now the largest most capable aircraft carrier in the Royal Navy. Eagle now operated Blackburn Buccaneer, de Havilland Sea Vixen, Supermarine Scimitar and Fairey Gannet aircraft.


    Final Air Wing 1971


    * 800 sqn. 14 Buccaneer S2
    * 899 sqn. 16 Sea Vixen FAW2
    * 849 sqn. D flt. 4 Gannet AEW3, 1 Gannet COD4
    * 826 sqn. 5 Sea King HAS1
    * Ships Flight 1 Wessex HAS1 (SAR)


    In early 1966 she was refitted at Devonport once more to give her more powerful catapults. She recommissioned in 1967. Eagle was originally intended to receive a further refit that would have enabled her to comfortably operate ("Eagle" had already successfully operated them in trials) the McDonnell Douglas Phantom, however after damaging a propeller blade this was cancelled even though it would have only cost around £2 million compared to the £32 million spent on Ark Royal which was considered to be in significantly worse material state than Eagle.[citation needed]


    The 1966 decision to run-down the RN fixed wing carrier fleet (Centaur, and Victorious had already been laid up and scrapped) meant Eagle's days were numbered. Despite being the RNs most modern carrier, in excellent material condition,[citation needed] and capable of another 10 years of service,[citation needed] Eagle was paid off (many in the RN believed she should have been retained, and Ark Royal or Hermes decommissioned instead) in January 1972 at Portsmouth, and was stripped of reusable equipment (radars and missile systems primarily), after which she was towed to Devonport where she was placed in reserve and moored in a stretch of the river Tamar known as the Hamoaze. In 1974, she was released from her moorings, towed up river, and secured in number 10 Dock, Devonport Dockyard, where she was further stripped of essential spares for Ark Royal, before being towed back out to her mooring position. Up until 1976 she was officially still in reserve, but having been exhausted as a source of spares for Ark Royal, Eagle was then sold for scrap and towed from Devonport in October 1978 to Cairnryan near Stranraer in Scotland to be broken up, clearing her mooring space for her sister. Eagle was completely broken up by the time her sister arrived at Cairnryan in November 1980. One of her anchors (along with one of Ark Royal's) stands guard at the entrance to the Fleet Air Arm Museum in Yeovilton.


    Webpages
    Keith Willingale article on vineyard
    Keith Willingale article on vineyard
    BBC - Wiltshire
    Keith Willingale - article on Bow in the Cloud vineyard
    Keith Willingale - article on Bow in the Cloud vineyard
    ),(
    Keith Willingale
    Keith Willingale
    Bow in the Cloud
    Wine - Roger Scruton hails English wine.
    Wine - Roger Scruton hails English wine.
    Raising a glass to an Indian summer
    Raising a glass to an Indian summer